The world in peril: More cities succumbing to climate change

One of the main drivers of climate change is human activity. Industrial plants, car fumes, and all sorts of wastes just keep on accumulating at an alarming rate. It is no surprise that for the past couple of years, climate change has accelerated. More and more instances of extreme weather are being observed in many settlements, including capital cities and major metropolitan areas. That’s why some governments are actively putting in the work to increase their resilience. These regions include Toronto, Vancouver, and Calgary. However, some cities aren’t so lucky.

 

One of the most vulnerable cities to environmental inconsistencies is Jakarta, Indonesia. Urbanization and land utilization are already almost maxed out, which translates into an distressing increase in carbon dioxide emissions and deforestation. Furthermore, its geographical proximity to the ocean makes it highly susceptible to the rising sea levels. Floods are already a recurrent problem. Incurred losses could easily reach beyond $500,000, affecting both farming and fishing livelihoods.

 

Image source: time.com

 

Another area which is prone to Mother Nature’s wrath is Dhaka, Bangladesh. Since it is one of the biggest deltaic regions in the world, the rising sea level and increased rainfall will make it highly vulnerable to flooding. As a matter of fact, as much as 80 percent of the area could be submerged in water.

 

Back in 2010, Mumbai, India, experienced its highest rainfall density in a span of 24 hours. More than 700 lives perished in the flood that submerged the busy city. Property damage was estimated to be at $68 million. With incidences like these occurring more often, a lifestyle check is in order.

 

Image source: inhabitat.com

 

Climate change can have massive impacts on various sectors, eventually leading to economic collapse and human peril. It can drive various health problems (including malaria, diarrhea, and leptospirosis outbreaks), displacement due to floods and sea-level rise, large-scale property damage, biodiversity loss, widespread famine, and even dents on stock markets. The total costs of all these impacts have been found to be enormous, costing the world more than $1.2 trillion a year and wiping 1.6 percent annually from global GDP. This is one of the reasons many companies and governments have been very active in promoting green technologies and in promoting environmentally friendly industrial and household activities to lessen, slow down, or even completely eradicate the potential hazards climate change can bring.