A unique Caribbean experience: Laidback and unspoiled Vieques

One of the most popular holiday destinations for spring breakers and families alike are the Caribbean Islands. It consists of an archipelago in the Caribbean Sea, a large arm of the Atlantic Ocean. Because of their natural beauty, year after year hundreds of thousands of tourists flock to these islands. The clear blue waters, white sandy beaches, and warm tropical climate make them a year-round summer destination. However, there are some vacation-goers who may shy away from the Caribbean because of the large crowds. Luckily, there is an island in the Caribbean which is just perfect for their preferences.

 

Image source: vieques.com 

 

The Vieques is a 21-mile long and 4-mile wide island.  In terms of land area, it is very identical to the nearby (and more popular) Saint Martin.  The main difference lies in the number of tourists. Annually, 70,000 people visit Vieques, while its neighboring island would easily number in the millions. For the former, the numbers can only mean two things: unspoilt beaches and a lot of elbow room. Plus, it’s one of the very few islands in the world to have a bioluminescent bay, a beach that glows neon blue every night.

 

Granted, Vieques is not one of the most known or most luxurious islands in the Caribbean, but it can give tourists a different kind of experience that can’t be found anywhere else. They have an ocean so blue and so clear that you can see right to the bottom. It’s also perfect for sailing on one’s very own boat, drinking out in the open sea while grilling a sumptuous steak. Since there aren’t a lot of people on the beach, visitors will be able to feel like they have their very own private Caribbean beach.

 

Image source: bluehorizonboutiqueresort.com

 

The likes of Bermuda, Dominica, and the British Virgin Islands are also stunning places to visit, with relatively fewer visitors compared to the likes of Cuba and Dominican Republic but with equally gorgeous natural scenery to boast of. In addition, these are islands with thriving financial industries, which means that they have well-developed infrastructure and First World-level public services.